Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.
— Andre Gide

NOTE:  Please do not consider the following as legal advice. Laws, regulations and ministerial instructions constantly change and the information can not be used to make immigration decisions.  There are also constant changes in case law that could effect the outcome of cases. Case law is also not considered here. Please contact Matrixvisa Inc for immigration legal advice.

There are several main classes of Immigrants created by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. These are:

  • Federal Skilled Worker Class
  • Federal Skills Trades Class
  • Canada Experience Class
  • Provincial Nominee Class

A foreign national must qualify according to the requirements of each immigration class. Once the foreign national qualifies, the foreign national may enter the 'immigration pool' named Express Entry.  Foreign nationals are drawn from the Express Entry pool every few weeks based on a certain passmark.

In attempting to clarify all the immigration opportunities for skilled workers (not entrepreneurs, investors and business applicants) we made a simplified summary of the options with the aid of the mind map below (a tool often used assist memorizing complex issues).

The Canadian immigration system is complex and becoming increasingly complex each year. A good example of this complexity is in the provincial immigration programs. Matrixvisa Inc purchased a handbook that is written about provincial immigration programs. Initially it costs about CAD$300 (R3000) and another $1200 per annum (R12000) to get the updates. Eventually the quarterly updates could not keep up with the speed of the changes.

In order to keep my right to practice immigration law,  authorized representatives must attend conferences and continue legal training to keep up with the changes (both federal and provincial immigration changes).  

The legal authorities & sources that guide immigration decisions consist of 7 levels:

  1. The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (about 60 pages);
  2. The Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (about 200-300 pages);
  3. Immigration Manual (rules written by officials which have about 100 chapters and can fill 5 wheelbarrows);
  4. Operational memorandums that are regularly published;
  5. Case law (decisions by judges in Federal Court); and,
  6. Immigration Rules as stipulated in the Immigration Manual.
  7. Some visa officers at the embassies and high  commissions make their own rules, which are not written anywhere. If these decisions are outside the scope of the law, we object to the Immigration Department and the Minister.  Many of our efforts can be seen here http://www.matrixvisa.com/achievements/. Further, officers interpret the Immigration Regulations and Immigration Rules differently so there is not a consistent application of all rules in decisions.  One can only understand how decisions are made after the behavior of officers are observed for many years.

Six Options for  Skilled Immigrants

In the Canadian immigration system there are 6 broad options for skilled workers to emigrate.  These 6 options are explained with the aid of the following  mind map; once an immigrant has been a permanent resident in Canada, an application can be submitted for Canadian Citizenship. 

This mind map is a depiction of the 6 possibilities open to a skilled worker (medical doctor, welder, nurse, etc.) to emigrate to Canada.  Option 1 and 2  can be classified as federal options, and options 3 to 6 as provincial options.
 
Option 1: Job offer with a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)
A Job offer by itself is worthless because a job offer only has value if it is supported by a LMIA for a provincial certificate of nomination (Option 3,4 or 5). Similar to a human, an LMIA stands on two legs: one leg represents the effect of the employment of the foreign national on the Labour Market and the second represents the Genuineness Test of the job offer.
 
In assessing the Labour Market 'leg' of the LMIA, an officer has a statutory duty (i.e. a legal duty) to assess seven factors. The four most important factors include:

  • Did the employer advertise for 28 days at three national websites in an attempt to find a Canadian? There are about 28 pages of special rules about what must be in these advertisements.  We are the first immigration law firm (consultancy) that discovered these secret rules and it is on our website under the link “ Our Achievements”
  • Is there a shortage of skilled Canadians in this specific occupation in a specific part of the country?
  • Is the wage being offered to the foreign national the same wage that is being paid to Canadians performing the same job in the same area of the country?
  • There may not be any labour dispute at the work place.

LMIA's can be added to an applicant's Express Entry profile to increase the points by 600.

 
Option 2: Draw in Express Entry (without a job offer) 
Every 2 weeks names are drawn from the Express Entry Pool (Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skills Trades Class, Canada Experience Class). The passmark is floating and the lowest draw is about 450 points.  There are many discussions on internet forums where potential immigrants confuse one another about the Express Entry option. There is a hype surrounding express entry, as it is “express” right? Wrong.  It is not so great as you might think it is. The majority of applicants will not qualify for a draw from the Express Entry Pool as their points do not come close to 400 points. 
 
The rhetorical question is, why are applicants so focused on Express Entry? Well there are many possible reasons.

  • One is issue is the name which was chosen for political (vote seeking) reasons as the current federal government wanted to be viewed as the saviour of the immigration system.
  • Secondly, many immigration law companies (inside Canada) and some outside of Canada (many are owned by people whom are not Canadians, never studied Canadian law, and who are not authorized Immigration representatives) do not explain the reality of Express Entry to their clients.  Getting the documents in order (language tests, Educational Credential assessments) are obviously important.
  • Thirdly, immigrants excite one another about Express Entry on online forums without understanding what the actual policy is and when Express Entry should be used.

The system is too complex and employers are just too busy to seek applicants in the pool. If you are in the pool, no one is going to come look for you there.

Option 3: Provincial Occupation List
Two provinces both published occupation lists on 1 Jan 2016. They had 750 openings for which they allowed 750 nominations without job offers.  Each province had a scoring system and each applicant had to have the minimum required score.  What we do not know is how many applications they received and how they selected the 750 lucky immigrants. That process of selection remains hidden to the public.
 
Matrixvisa Inc. has submitted several requests in terms of Provincial Freedom of Information and Privacy Act (FOIP) to obtain a list of shortages. For example, we are probably  the only immigration law company that knows in which province primary school teachers and farm managers are in short supply (in the list of top 20 shortages of that specific province).   We share this type of knowledge with clients who appoint us to help them to emigrate. 

Option 4: Provincial Selection by a Province from Express Entry (Federal Pool) (Ontario, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, etc)


The Province of Ontario draws 1712 names from the pool of people who have 400 points or more. The catch is that these people had to enter the pool after 1 June 2015. Those that applied on 31 May were not drawn and no one knows the logic for that decision. The Ontario Government did not review the labour shortages at all before the draw was made. Strictly speaking, a person with an honours degree in Egyptian Hieroglyphics could get drawn without smallest chance of a job offer after arrival. The Ontario Government conducted another draw for people that entered the pool after 23 Nov 2015; people with a score of at least 412 were successful and received an invitation from the Ontario Government. It is unclear why the Ontario government would not draw from applications entered before 31 May and 23 of November 2015.

The province of Saskatchewan allowed 500 applications during December 2015. Applicants had to be entered into the Federal Express Entry Pool (no need for a certa

in score) and had to score at least 60 out of a  100 in Saskatchewan's Provincial Scoring system. The positions were filled in 7 days. During 2015 the Saskatchewan Government only allowed applicants to apply to Saskatchewan in the Express Entry Pool if the applicant has specific experience in a  list of the following occupations: 

0213    Computer and information systems managers
0423    Managers in social, community and correctional services    
0513    Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors    
0714    Facility operation and maintenance managers    
0821    Managers in agriculture    
1224    Property administrators    
1225    Purchasing agents and officers
1252    Health information management occupations    
2161    Mathematicians, statisticians and actuaries    
2171    Information systems analysts and consultants    
2221    Biological technologists and technicians    
2225    Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists    
2231    Civil engineering technologists and technicians    
2232    Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians    
2244    Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors    No
2253    Drafting technologists and technicians    
2255    Technical occupations in geomantic and meteorology    
7253    Gas fitters
7312    Heavy-duty equipment mechanics    
7321    Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers    
7332    Appliance servicers and repairers

Manitoba has a unique scoring system that is independent from the Federal Express Entry system. This point system is skewed towards applicants that have already been working for Manitoba employers for longer than 6 months. The total score is 1000 points and 500 points are awarded for these job offers. Applicants can lose points (100 points are actually subtracted for each of the following: work experience in another province, family in another province, education in another province or previous immigration applications in other provinces).

British Columbia's Express Entry stream requires an applicant to have a job offer (inter alia). Employers do not have to provide advertising.

Option 5: Provincial Government  Nomination (Non Federal Express Entry & Paper Applications)

About 40 000 immigrants per annum obtain their permanent residence every year with these paper applications. Here are a few examples of different programs under this Non Federal Express Entry Process. In many cases it is a paper process.

Here are 4 examples of different type of applications: 

  • Job offer:  Each provincial government has an agreement with the federal government to nominate specific individuals for immigration to Canada. These rules are complex and constantly changing.
    • Some provinces require an employer to first advertise (30 days in Ontario and 14 days in British Columbia) 
    • In some provinces only require the job to be genuine only without advertising/domestic recruitment (Saskatchewan and Newfoundland).
    • In Alberta the foreign national must already be working in Alberta.
       
  • Masters Degree: In Ontario foreign nationals that completed a Masters degree in ON could be eligible for nomination.
     
  • Special Connection: In  New Brunswick foreign nationals with a "special connection" such as previous study, previous work experience or family would be allowed to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI).
     
  • Attended a formal  Information Session or Meeting at International Recruitment Session:  The New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program would allow EOI from foreign nationals that attended a Information Session or Meeting at International Recruitment Session in the preceding 2 years.  Priority will be given to these occupations (this is anew list that appeared on 15 July 2016):

NOC Code and Occupations
#0621  Retail and wholesale trade managers
#1241  Administrative assistants
#1221  Administrative officers
#3233  Licensed practical nurses
#6322  Cooks
#0631  Restaurant and food service managers
#1311  Accounting technicians and bookkeepers
#9241  Power engineers and power systems operators
#0821  Managers in agriculture
#7242  Industrial electricians
#1224  Property administrators
#0016  Senior managers – construction, transportation, production and utilities
#0911  Manufacturing managers
#1225  Purchasing agents and officers
#0311  Managers in health care
#6211  Retail sales supervisors
#0601  Corporate sales managers
#2171  Information systems analysts and consultants
#2172  Database analysts and data administrators
#2173  Software engineers and designers
#2174  Computer programmers and interactive media developers
#2175  Web designers and developers
#2281  Computer network technicians
#2282  User support technicians
#0111  Financial managers
#0714  Facility operation and maintenance managers
#0013  Senior managers – financial, communications and other business services
#3211  Medical laboratory technologists
#6311  Food service supervisors
#0121  Insurance, real estate and financial brokerage managers

 

Option 6: Strategic Recruitment by a Provincial Government
Finally we get to the best kept secret of the immigration programs. Some provinces have launched so called 'strategic recruitment drives' to certain countries. I was told that a specific province issued nomination certificates to French citizens when they came to the booth at an immigration trade show in France. They were French and it was their lucky day, I suppose.  In provinces where this opportunity exists it opens up the opportunity for a large employer to negotiate with a province for a large batch of people. We have made a proposal to a very large employer to bring in mechanics, millwrights, electricians, instrumentation technicians and specialized engineers through this scheme.  This type of scheme has basically no rules and whatever the provincial government decides will be the rules of the a specific ad hoc program.
 


FEDERAL SKILLED WORKER CLASS REQUIREMENTS

A Federal Skilled Worker could qualify to enter Express Entry (Immigration Pool)  if an applicant achieves 67 points or more.

Occupations open for applications
Within 10 years preceding the date of application for a permanent residence visa, an applicant requires at least one year of full time employment experience (37.5 hours per week), or part time experience in one or more skilled occupations (Skill Level 0, A or B)  as listed in the National Occupation Classification (other than restricted occupation). These occupations must be listed in:

  • Skill Type 0 (zero) Management Occupations
    OR
  • Skill Level A: University Degree at Bachelor or higher level
    OR
  • Skill Level B:
    • 2 or 3 years post secondary education at a community college, institute of technology
    • 2-4 years of apprenticeship training
    • 3-4 years of secondary school education and more than 2 years on the job training, specialized training courses or specific work experience
    • Occupations with supervisory responsibilities and occupations with significant health and safety responsibilities, such as firefighters, police officers and registered nursing assistants are all assigned skill level B
    • A total of 75 points must achieved with the following criteria:


Education
Maximum 25 points for education for the occupation for which the applicant is applying

  • 5 points: 5 points for completion of secondary school
  • 12 points: for one year post secondary educational credential and a total of 12 years of full time or equivalent of full time studies
  • 15 points: for one year post secondary educational credential and at least 13 years of full time or equivalent of full time studies or one year university educational credential at the Bachelor level and a total of at least 13 years of full time or full time equivalent studies.
  • 20 points: for two year post secondary educational credential and a total of 14 years of full time or equivalent full time studies or a two year university educational credential at the bachelor level and total of at least 14 years of full time or equivalent full time studies.
  • 22 points: for a three year post secondary credential requiring at least three years of full time study and a total of 15 years of full time of full time equivalent studies or for two or more university credentials at a bachelor level and a total of 15 years of full time of full time equivalent studies
  • 25 points: for a masters of doctoral educational credential and a total of 17 years of full time or equivalent full time studies
     

Age
Maximum 10 points for age

  • Under Age 18= zero points
  • 18-25= 12 points
  • 36  years = 11 points 
  • 37 years  = 10  points
  • 38 years  =  9  points
  • 39 years = 8 points
  • 40 years = 7 points
  • 41 years = 6 points
  • 42 years = 5 points
  • 43 years = 4 points
  • 44 years = 3 points
  • 45 years = 2 points
  • 46 years = 1 point
  • 47 years and older = 0 points


Language
Maximum 24 points for proficiency in English and French

  • For ability to speak listen read or write with high proficiency
    • In the first official language: 4 points for each of the abilities
    • In the second official language: 2 points for each of the abilities
  • For ability to speak listen read or write with moderate proficiency
    • In the first official language: 2 points for each of the abilities
    • In the second official language: 2 points for each of the abilities
  • For ability to speak listen read or write with basic proficiency
    • In the either of the official languages 1 point for each of the abilities up to 2 points


Experience
Maximum 21 points for experience. Within 10 years preceding the date of application

  • 9 points for one year experience
  • 11 points for two to three  years experience
  • 13  points for four to five years experience
  • 15 points for 6 or more  years or more experience
     

Arranged Employment
Maximum of 10 points if the person has a work permit supported by a  Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).  These job offers must be genuine, full time and wages and working conditions must be normal.

Adaptability
Maximum of 10 points is awarded for a combination of any of the following elements: 

  • educational credentials of spouse of common law partner: 3, 4 or 5 points
  • any previous study in Canada: 5 points
  • any previous work in Canada: 5 points
  • offer of employment in Canada: 5 points
  • person living in Canada (family) as described below: 5 points

     

'Educational credentials of spouse'

3 points: if the spouse was the applicant and would have received 12-15 points, the spouse would get 3 under adaptability
4 points: if the spouse was the applicant and would have received 20-25 points, the spouse would get 4 under adaptability
5 points: if the spouse was the applicant and would have received 25 points, the spouse would get 5 under adaptability

'Previous study in Canada'

5 Points if the applicant or applicant's spouse or accompanying common law partner after age of 17 completed a program of 2 years full time study at a post secondary institution in Canada on a study permit.

'Previous work in Canada'

5 Points if the applicant or applicant's accompanying common law partner have one year full time work experience in Canada under a work permit.

'Offer of Employment'

5 Points if the applicant has a genuine offer of employment (does not have to be validated by HRDC)

'Family relationship in Canada'

5 Points if the applicant or applicant's spouse, or accompanying common law partner is related by blood, marriage or adoption to a person in Canada that is a permanent resident or citizen that is a: 

  • mother or father
  • grandmother or grandfather
  • their child
  • a child of their child (grandchild)
  • a child of their mother or father (brother or sister)
  • child of the father or mother of their father or mother other than their mother or father (i.e. uncle or aunt)
  • child of the child of their mother or father (child of brother or sister)

 

FEDERAL SKILLS TRADES CLASS REQUIREMENTS

The Federal Skills Trades Class require an applicant to meet 3 requirements: 

  • at least 2 years experience (at least 30 hours per week) in the preceding 5 years in the occupation in which the person applies. During this period the person must have performed the duties in the relevant jurisdictions independently; 
  • A Canadian Provincial Certificate of Qualification "Blue Seal or Red Seal" OR a Labour Market Impact Assessment;" AND 
  • The applicant must also have  a specific language ability: 

        Canadian Language Benchmark = CLB
        International English language Benchmark = IELTS
           CLB 5 for speaking = IELTS 5
           CLB 5 for Listening = IELTS 5
           CLB 4 for reading = IELTS 3.5
           CLB 4 for writing = IELTS 4

There are about 90 occupations that is listed in this immigration class: 

The ninety skilled trades currently eligible for the Federal Skilled Trades Program are organized under these major and minor groups of the NOC:

Major Group 72, industrial, electrical and construction trades,
Major Group 73, maintenance and equipment operation trades,
Major Group 82, supervisors and technical jobs in natural resources, agriculture and related production,
Major Group 92, processing, manufacturing and utilities supervisors and central control operators,
Minor Group 632, chefs and cooks, and
Minor Group 633, butchers and bakers.

The ninety occupations under these 6 groups are as follows:

7201 Contractors and supervisors, machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades and related occupations
7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
7203 Contractors and supervisors, pipefitting trades
7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
7232 Tool and die makers
7233 Sheet metal workers
7234 Boilermakers
7235 Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters
7236 Ironworkers
7237 Welders and related machine operators
7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
7242 Industrial electricians
7243 Power system electricians
7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
7247 Cable television service and maintenance technicians
7251 Plumbers
7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
7253 Gas fitters
7271 Carpenters
7272 Cabinetmakers
7281 Bricklayers
7282 Concrete finishers
7283 Tilesetters
7284 Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers and lathers
7291 Roofers and shinglers
7292 Glaziers
7293 Insulators
7294 Painters and decorators (except interior decorators)
7295 Floor covering installers
7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
7303 Supervisors, printing and related occupations
7304 Supervisors, railway transport operations
7305 Supervisors, motor transport and other ground transit operators
731 Machinery and transportation equipment mechanics (except motor vehicle)
7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
7314 Railway carmen/women
7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
7316 Machine fitters
7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers
7322 Motor vehicle body repairers
7331 Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics
7332 Appliance servicers and repairers
7333 Electrical mechanics
7334 Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics
7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers
7361 Railway and yard locomotive engineers
7362 Railway conductors and brakemen/women
7371 Crane operators
7372 Drillers and blasters - surface mining, quarrying and construction
7373 Water well drillers
7381 Printing press operators
7384 Other trades and related occupations, n.e.c.
8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling and services
8231 Underground production and development miners
8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
8241 Logging machinery operators
8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
8255 Contractors and supervisors, landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services
8261 Fishing masters and officers
8262 Fishermen/women
9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
9213 Supervisors, food, beverage and associated products processing
9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
9215 Supervisors, forest products processing
9217 Supervisors, textile, fabric, fur and leather products processing and manufacturing
9221 Supervisors, motor vehicle assembling
9222 Supervisors, electronics manufacturing
9223 Supervisors, electrical products manufacturing
9224 Supervisors, furniture and fixtures manufacturing
9226 Supervisors, other mechanical and metal products manufacturing
9227 Supervisors, other products manufacturing and assembly
9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
9235 Pulping, papermaking and coating control operators
9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators
6321 Chefs
6321 Cooks
6331 Butchers, meat cutters and fishmongers - retail and wholesale
6332 Bakers

 

PROVINCIAL NOMINEE CLASS REQUIREMENTS

If a province nominates a foreign national, the nomination certificate may be used for immigration. The rules of the different provincial governments are constantly changing. Changes  in the rules can be extreme. For example during 2015 the British Columbia government and the Alberta Government both placed a pause on processing. The BC government replaced their scheme with a new Express Entry scheme.  The Alberta government closed their scheme in August 2015 and made an announcement that it would have a new provincial immigration scheme in January 2015.  It is expected to be based on job offers and a system  of points where the applicants with the highest score will be selected first. 

With the exception of Saskatchewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia, all provincial governments would only nominate someone with a job offer.

Some provinces have a minimum language score and some provinces do not require a specific language proficiency test at all.  For example, the minimum English language proficiency of the Provincial Nominee Class of Saskatchewan is currently (Sept 2015) as follows: 

Listening – IELTS  4.5
Reading –  IELTS 3.5
Writing –  IELTS 4
 Speaking – IELTS 4

 

CANADA EXPERIENCE CLASS REQUIREMENTS

In the Canada Experience Class an applicant must have 12 months working experience in Canada and have a specific language proficiency. 

 

EXPRESS ENTRY (FOR ALL CLASSES)

Once an applicant qualifies for one of the above mentioned classes they may enter the Express Entry Pool. Applicants are then selected based on a specific passmark  (selection points) that constantly change. The passmark during 2015 has fluctuated as follows:

886 points on 31 January 2015 that has resulted in 779 invitations
818 points on 7 February 2015 that has resulted in 779 invitations
808 points on 20 February 2015 that has resulted in 849 invitations
735 points on 27 February  2015  that has resulted in 1187 invitations
481 points on 20 March 2015  that has resulted in 481 invitations
453 points on 27 March 2015 that has resulted in 1637 invitations
469 points on 10 April 2015 that has resulted in 925 invitations
453 points on 17 April  2015 that has resulted in 715 invitations
755 points on 22 May 2015 that has resulted in 1261 invitations
482 points on 12 June 2015 that has resulted in 1501 invitations
469 points on 26 June 2015 that has resulted in 1575 invitations
463 points on 10 July 2015 that has resulted in 1516 invitations
451 points on 17 July 2015 that has resulted in 1581 invitations
471 points on 7 Aug  2015 471 that has resulted in 1402 invitations
459 points on 8 September  2015 that has resulted in 1517 invitations
450 points on 18 Sept 2015 that has resulted in 1545 invitations
450 points on 2 October 2015 that has resulted in 1530 invitations
489 points on 23 October 2015 that has resulted in 1502 invitations
484 points on 13 November 2015 that has resulted in 1506 invitations
472 points on 27 November 2015 that has resulted in 1559 invitations
461 points on 4 December 2015 that has resulted in 1451 invitations
460 points on 18 December 2015 that resulted in 1503  invitations
461  points on 6 January 2016 that resulted in 1463 invitations
453 points on 13 January 2016 that resulted in 1518 invitations
457 points on 27 January 2016 that resulted in 1468 invitations
459 points on 10 February 2016 that resulted in 1505 invitations
453 points on 28 February 2016 that resulted in 1484 invitations
473 points on 9 March 2016 that resulted in 1013 invitations
470 points on 23 March 2016 that resulted in 1014 invitations
470 points on 6 April 2016 that resulted in 954 invitations
468 points on 20 April 2016 that resulted in 1018 invitations
534 points on 6 May 2016 that resulted in 799 invitations
484 points on 18 May 2016 that resulted in 763 invitations
483 points on 1 June 2016 that resulted in 762 invitations
488 points on 15 June 2016 that resulted in 752 invitations
482 points on 29 June 2016 that resulted in 773 invitations
482 points on 13 July 2016 that resulted in 747 invitations
488 points on 27 July 2016 that resulted in 755 invitations
490 points on 10 August 2016 that resulted in 754 invitations
538 points on 24 August 2016 that resulted in 750 invitations
491 points on 8 September 2016 that resulted in 1000 invitations
483 points on 21 September 2016 that resulted in 1288 invitations
 

Important Note: On 15 October 2015 the National Post newspaper  in Canada reported on the failure of the Express Entry System: from 1 Jan 205 to 6 July 2015, 112 701 people applied in Express Entry. Of those only 844 permanent residence visas were issued to applicants and their dependants by end of  July 2015. About half of them,  (411 including dependants, out of a possible 112 701), arrived in Canada by 15 October 2015. By comparison, during 2014,  43 000 economic immigrants landed on Canadian shores. Such figures prove the current system is not working well; Canadian competitiveness is suffering due to lack of skilled workers. The article further mentions the many technical problems with the Express Entry system.

The points in Express Entry are calculated based on 4 major groups:

A- Core/Human Capital factors
B- Spouse or Common Law factors
C-Skills Transferability Factors
D-Additional Points (Job offer supported by a provincial certificate of nomination or a labour market Impact Assessment)

 

A.  CORE/HUMAN CAPITAL FACTORS

These factors focus on the age,   level of education, official language ability and Canadian  work experience of the applicant and the spouse.

Factor Points (Per factor) - With a Spouse or common-law partner Points (Per factor) - Without a Spouseor common-law partner
Age 100 110
Level of Education 140 150
Official Languages Proficiency 150 160
Canadian Work Experience 70 80


B.  SPOUSE /COMMON LAW PARTNER FACTORS

Factor Points (Per factor) - With a Spouse or common-law partner Points (Per factor) - Without a Spouseor common-law partner
Age 100 110
Level of Education 140 150
Official Languages Proficiency 150 160
Canadian Work Experience 70 80

A. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner factors = Maximum 500 points (with OR without a spouse or common-law partner)

 C.  SKILLS TRANSFERABILITY FACTORS

Education Points (Per factor) - Max 50 Points
With good/strong official languages proficiency and post-secondary degree 50
With Canadian work experience and post secondary degree 50
Foreign Work Experience Points (Per factor) - Max 50 Points
With good/strong official languages proficiency and post-secondary degree 50
With Canadian work experience and post secondary degree 50
Certificate of Qualification (for people in trade occupations) Points (Per factor) - Max 50 Points
With good/strong official languages proficiency and a certificate of qualification 50

D.  ADDITIONAL POINTS - MAX 600 (JOB OFFER SUPPORTED BY A LABOUR MARKET IMPACT ASSESSMENT OR PROVINCIAL NOMINEE CERTIFICATE)

Factor Points (Per factor)
Arranged Employment (positive Labour Market Impact Assessment required) 600
PN nomination 600

 

POINTS BREAKDOWN - SECTION BY SECTION

CRS - A. Core/human capital factors

  • With a spouse of common-law partner: Maximum 460 points total for all factors
  • Without a spouse of common-law partner: Maximum 500 points total for all factors
Age With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 100 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 100 points)
17 years of age or less 0 0
18 years of age 90 99
19 years of age 95 105
20-29 years of age 100 110
30 years of age 95 105
31 years of age 90 99
32 years of age 85 94
33 years of age 80 88
34 years of age 75 83
35 years of age 70 77
36 years of age 65 72
37 years of age 60 66
38 years of age 55 61
39 years of age 50 55
40 years of age 45 50
41 years of age 35 39
42 years of age 25 28
43 years of age 15 17
44 years of age 5 6
45 years of age 0 0
Level of Education With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 140 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 150 points)
Less than secondary school (high school) 0 0
Secondary Diploma (high school graduation) 28 30
One-year degree, diploma or certificate from a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 84 90
Two-year degree, diploma or certificate from a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 91 98
Bachelor's degree or a three or more year degree, diploma or certificate from a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 112 120
Two or more certificates, diploma or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years. 119 128
Master's degree, OR professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree,” the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 126 135
Doctoral level university degree (Ph.D.) 140 150
Canadian work experience With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 70 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 80 points)
None or less than a year 0 0
1 Year 35 40
2 Years 46 53
3 Years 56 64
4 Years 63 72
5 Years or More 70 80

Official Languages Proficiency - first official language
Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

  • 32 for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and understanding) with a spouse or common-law partner
  • 34  for each ability (reading writing, speaking and understanding) without a spouse or common-law partner
Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 120 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 136 points)
Less than CLB 4 0 0
CLB 4 or 5 6 6
CLB 6 8 9
CLB 7 16 17
CLB 8 22 23
CLB 9 29 31
CLB 10 or more 32 34

Official Languages Proficiency - second official language
Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

  • 6 with a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 22 points)
  • 6 without a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 24 points)
Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 22 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 24 points)
CLB 4 or less 0 0
CLB 5 or 6 1 1
CLB 7 or 8 3 3
CLB 9 or more 6 6

 

CRS - B. Spouse or common-law partner factors (if applicable)

Spouse's or common-law partner's level of education With a spouse or common-law partner
(Maximum 10 points)
Without a spouse or common-law partner
(N/A)
Less than secondary school (high school) 0 N/A
Secondary school (high school graduation) 2 N/A
One-year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 6 N/A
Two-year program at a university, college, trade or technical in school, or other institute 7 N/A
Bachelor's degree OR,a three or more year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 8 N/A
Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years 9 N/A
Master's degree, or professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree”, the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 10 N/A
Doctoral level university degree (PhD) 10 N/A

Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case. 

Spouse's or common-law partner's official languages proficiency - first official language

Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening ) Maximum 20 points for sectionMaximum 5 points per ability Without spouse or common-law partner
(N/A)
CLB 4 or less 0 N/A
CLB 5 or 6 1 N/A
CLB 7 or 8 3 N/A
CLB 9 or more 5 N/A

Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case. 

Spouse's Canadian Work Experience Maximum 10 points Without spouse or common-law partner
(N/A)
None or less than a year 0 N/A
1 year 5 N/A
2 year 7 N/A
3 year 8 N/A
4 year 9 N/A
5 year or more 10 N/A

Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case. 

 

CRS - C. Skill transferability factors (maximum 100 points for this section)


Education and Language

With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 7 or higher) and a post-secondary degree Points for CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, with one or more under CLB 9(Maximum 25 points) Points for CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
Secondary school (high school) credential or less 0 0
Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer 13 25
Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer (CLB 6,7 and 8 25 50


Education and Canadian Work Experience

With Canadian work experience and a post-secondary degree Points for education + 1 year of Canadian work experience(Maximum 25 points) Points for education + 2 year of Canadian work experience or more(Maximum 50 points)
Secondary school (high school) credential or less 0 0
Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer 13 25
Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer 25 50


Foreign Work Experience & Language 

Years of experience Points for foreign work experience + CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 9(Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
No foreign work experience 0 0
1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50


Foreign Work Experience - With Canadian Work Experience

Years of Experience Points for foreign work experience + 1 year of Canadian work experience (Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + 2 years or more of Canadian work experience (Maximum 50 points
No foreign work experience 0 0
1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50


With a Certificate of Qualification & Language

Certificate of qualification (trade occupations) – With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 5 or higher) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 5 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 7(Maximum 25 points) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 7 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
With a certificate of qualification 25 50

Subtotal: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Skill transferability factors - Maximum 600 points.

CRS-D. Additional Points

 

Additional points Maximum 600 points
Arranged employment (positive Labour Market Impact Assessment required) 600
Provincial or territorial nomination 600

Grand total:

A. Core / human capital PLUS
B. Spouse or common-law partner PLUS
C. Skill transferability factors PLUS
D. Additional points PLUS
= Maximum 1,200 points